trophy hunting

Divergent views on trophy hunting in Africa, and what this may mean for research and policy

Divergent views on trophy hunting in Africa, and what this may mean for research and policy - article

by Shaya van Houdt, Richard P. Brown, Thomas C. Wanger, Wayne Twine, Richard Fynn, Kenneth Uiseb, Rosie Cooney, Lochran W. Traill

An article that appeared on September 14, 2021 in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, authors Shaya van Houdt et al published the findings of an online survey through international networks to explore demographic and regional differences in opinion regards support for African trophy hunting, trophy import bans, and outside funding of conservation estates supported by hunting.

Over the past decade, trophy hunting in Africa has seen increased public and scientific interest. Much of that attention has come from outside of Africa, with little emphasis on local views. 

The survey saw 5700 responses and found that location, demography, and conservation background influenced opinion. African and North American respondents showed (significantly) more support for trophy hunting than respondents from Europe or other areas, as did respondents with conservation backgrounds. Unlike North Americans, Africans supported external subsidies of wildlife areas presently funded by hunting. Many factors affected opinions on African hunting, but respondent location played a major role. Realistic policy on African trophy hunting should thus integrate African perspectives, in particular those of rural communities.

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